Working groups at the IOBM

  • Bone Histology
    Histological section of bone in toluidine blue staining

    Divisional head:

    Prof. Dr. med. Michael Amling

    Dr. rer. nat. T. Yorgan

    Dr.-Ing. M. Hahn

    The section Translation & Histology is mainly concerned with the comprehensive histological analysis of bone and bone-associated cells. The focus lies on the translation of mechanical to biological signals, the patho-mechanisms of genetic disorders of the musculoskeletal system and the implant/biomaterial interface with bone.

    Further Information

    Lottestrasse 59
    20529 Hamburg
    Phone: +49 (0)40 7410 - 56373
    Mail: amling (at) uke.de

  • Vertebrae of a mouse
    Mice vertebrae in histological section

    Divisional head:

    Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Thorsten Schinke

    Diverse signalling pathways influence bone accrual as well as skeletal quality and structure on the cellular and biochemical level. Basic principles of skeletal biology, causes of skeletal diseases and innovate therapeutic options are being investigated by utilizing appropriate in vitro and in vivo models. The direct interaction with the clinic facilitates a fast application of novel insights and continuously gives raises to new research initiatives.


    Further Information

    Martinistrasse 52 (Campus Forschung, Gebäude N27, 1. Stock)
    20246 Hamburg
    Phone: +49 (0) 40 7410 - 58057
    Mail: schinke (at) uke.de

  • quantitative backscattered electrom imaging
    Spatial distribution of bone mineral.

    Divisional head:

    Univ.-Prof. Dr. rer. medic. Björn Busse

    Pathological alterations in the structural integrity and elemental composition of the bone matrix impact fracture resistance significantly and thereby affect the patients health status. The aim of the Heisenberg Research Group is to decipher the underlying mechanisms at each level of bone’s complex hierarchical structure using a multiscale, integrated approach combining osseous cell imaging with bone quality assessment and medical imaging techniques.

    Further Information


    Lottestraße 55a
    20529 Hamburg
    Phone: +49 (0) 40 7410 - 56373
    Mail: b.busse (at) uke.de

  • Osteoclast
    Osteoclast in scanning electron microscopy

    Divisional head:

    Dr. Jean-Pierre David

    Bone is not only building the skeleton but is also interacting with other organs. More specifically bone is homing hematopoiesis and is acting as an endocrine organ regulating adipose tissues. These tissues are themselves main regulators of bone homeostasis, thereby establishing a complex regulatory loop. As consequence, pathological alteration of bone should locally affect hematopoiesis and immune responses and, via its systemic effect, impact adipose tissue and therefore metabolism. The group is addressing these questions using multiple mouse models for bone diseases with the goal of improving the treatment of bone related diseases.

    Further Information


    Martinistrasse 52 (Campus Forschung, Gebäude N27, 1. Stock)
    20246 Hamburg
    Phone: +49 (0) 40 7410 - 54681
    Mail: j.david (at) uke.de